Wednesday, August 29, 2012

Paul Ryan's warning in speech at national GOP session: 'We don't have much time.'

Verne Strickland Blogmaster / August 29, 2012

'AMERICA NEEDS A TURNAROUND, AND THE MAN FOR THE JOB IS GOVERNOR MITT ROMNEY.'

By: Associated Press
August 29, 2012 11:06 PM est
















Seizing the spotlight, Paul Ryan told the Republican National Convention on Wednesday night that Mitt Romney "will not duck the tough issues" if he wins the White House this fall, and their party will move forcefully to solve the nation's economic woes. 


Republican vice presidential candidate, Rep. Paul Ryan.
     Rep. Paul Ryan in Tampa

"After four years of getting the runaround, America needs a turnaround, and the man for the job is Governor Mitt Romney," the Wisconsin lawmaker told the gathering dogged by Tropical Storm Isaac. The storm, though downgraded from a hurricane, was still inflicting misery on millions along the nearby northern Gulf Coast.

To the cheers of the delegates, he pledged Republicans would save Medicare from looming bankruptcy, despite constant accusations from Democrats that the GOP approach would shred the program that provides health care to more than 30 million seniors. 

"Our nation needs this debate. We want this debate. We will win this debate," Ryan declared. But he offered no details of the remedy Republicans would propose should they take the White House.

His speech was part attack on President Barack Obama, part spirited testimonial to Romney, all leavened by a loving tribute to Ryan's own mother, seated across the hall in a VIP box. 

"To this day, my mom is a role model," he said while she beamed and exchanged smiles with one of his children and delegates cheered. 

As for Obama and the Democrats, he said they `have run out of ideas. Their moment came and went. Fear and division is all they've got left." 

Ryan's vice presidential acceptance speech marked not only his turn to address convention delegates but also a prime-time national debut by a 42-year-old lawmaker lauded by fellow Republicans for his understanding of the complexities of the nation's budget. 

In a secondary role if only for a moment, Romney accused Obama of backing "reckless defense cuts" amounting to $1 trillion. "There are plenty of places to cut in a federal budget that now totals over $3 trillion. But defense is not one of them," Romney said in remarks that referred elliptically to the terror attacks of Sept. 11, 2001. 

Romney spoke to the American Legion in Indianapolis as his aides in Florida scripted an economy-and-veterans-themed program in their own convention hall and kept a wary eye on Isaac. The storm was threatening levees in the New Orleans area almost exactly seven years after the calamitous Hurricane Katrina.

If Ryan's selection was designed in part to appeal to conservatives, the convention was scripted to strengthen the ticket's appeals among women, Hispanics and others who prefer Obama over the Republicans, as well as veterans who supported John McCain in 2008.

"Republicans must acknowledge that not every dollar spent on the military is necessary or well-spent, and Democrats must admit that domestic welfare and entitlements must be reformed," he asserted.

In his speech, Ryan said, "The present administration has made its choices. And Mitt Romney and I have made ours: Before the math and the momentum overwhelm us all, we are going to solve this nation's economic problems. 

"And I'm going to level with you: We don't have that much time." 

As chairman of the House Budget Committee, Ryan is the architect of a plan to curb long-term deficits by reducing taxes and making deep cuts in accounts ranging from farm programs to education. He also advocates saving billions from remaking Medicare and Medicaid, the government's health care programs for seniors and the poor.